UCITS Liquidity Risk Management ESMAs 11 Areas for Improvement

UCITS Liquidity Risk Management: ESMA’s 11 Areas for Improvement

ESMA has published the results of the 2020 Common Supervisory Action (CSA) on UCITS liquidity risk management (LRM). UCITS are characterised by the offer to investors of on-demand liquidity. Article 84(1) states that UCITS shall repurchase or redeem its units at the request of any unit-holder. If the assets held within the fund cannot be sold quickly to meet redemption requests, there could be severe issues in paying redeeming investors. This can be exacerbated in times of stress when investors may look to redeem en masse whilst the market for the assets is drying up.

Are you complying with the cost related provisions of the UCITS framework?

Are you complying with the cost related provisions of the UCITS framework?

Yesterday, ESMA announced that it will be launching a Common Supervisory Action (CSA) with national competent authorities (NCAs) on the supervision of costs and fees of UCITS across the European Union. The CSA aims to assess the compliance of supervised entities with the relevant cost-related provisions in the UCITS framework, and the obligation of not charging investors with undue costs.

During the CSA, national competent authorities will take into account the supervisory briefing on the supervision of costs published by ESMA in June 2020.

Asset Managers Need to Step Up Their Liquidity Efforts – ESMAs Five Key Priorities

Asset Managers Need to Step Up Their Liquidity Efforts – ESMA’s Five Key Priorities

Throughout the year regulators have focused on liquidity, and as this year draws to a close, that focus shows no signs of diminishing. “Asset managers need to step up their efforts to ensure the liquidity of their funds is adequately managed and that they are prepared for future shocks” – that was the closing remarks from Steven Maijoor’s Keynote Address at EFAMA’s Investment Management Forum which heavily focused on liquidity risk.

SEC Adopts Modernized Regulatory Framework for Derivatives Use

SEC Adopts Modernized Regulatory Framework for Derivatives Use

On Wednesday, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) approved 3 to 2, the 458 page derivative use rules aimed at enhancing the regulatory framework for derivatives in the U.S. The Investment Company Act limits the ability of registered funds and business development companies to engage in transactions that involve potential future payment obligations, including obligations under derivatives such as forwards, futures, swaps and written options. The new rules, which apply to mutual funds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), close-end funds, as well as business development companies, will permit funds to enter into these transactions if they comply with certain conditions outlined below, which are designed to increase investor protection.